Hafan Llyfrau Basged Man Talu Fy Nghyfrif Cymorth Cynigion Arbennig Cysylltu   English  
 
Dod o Hyd i Siop Lyfrau
 
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Cofrestru
Gwybodaeth Lyfryddol
Heritage, Place and Community
Bella Dicks
ISBN: 9780708316689 (0708316689)Dyddiad Cyhoeddi Rhagfyr 2000
Cyhoeddwr: Gwasg Prifysgol Cymru / University of Wales Press, Caerdydd
Fformat: Clawr Meddal, 216x138 mm, 316 tudalen Iaith: Saesneg Allan o brint Ein Pris: £16.99   
Does dim Adolygiad Cwsmer i'r teitl hwn.
 
Ysgrifennwch Adolygiad Cwsmer
Hanes datblygiad Parc Treftadaeth y Rhondda a leolwyd ar safle glofa Lewis Merthyr, yn cynnwys astudiaeth o'r berthynas rhwng treftadaeth Gymreig a hunaniaeth ddiwylliannol, gymdeithasol ac economaidd. 2 ffotograff du-a-gwyn.

The story of the development of the Rhondda Heritage Park located on the site of the Lewis Merthyr colliery, including a study of the relationship between Welsh heritage and its cultural, social and economic identity. 2 black-and-white photographs.
Bella Dicks has set out to tell the 'biography' of the Rhondda Heritage Park in her Heritage, Place and Community. This stimulating book is much more than a story of one heritage site; it is a largely successful attempt to place that site in the context of its local and regional history as well as in the midst of the 'heritage debate' and the attendant analysis of tourist practices.

As Dicks explains, by the early 1980s the 'Valleys' signalled economic decline, unemployment and social exclusion. The Thatcherite response was to call for a new economy based around tourism, consumption and leisure. Thus Lewis Merthyr colliery, which closed in 1983, would be transformed into a heritage site. Locally, many worried that this entailed the replacement of 'proper' jobs with menial and casual ones and, from the beginning, the project was bedevilled with internal contradictions and stalked by political conflict between the local authorities involved (Labour Rhondda vs. Plaid Taff-Ely).

Enthusiasts for a 'people's museum' ran up against the fashion for heritage consultants; pride in the Rhondda's often politically-radical and industrially-turbulent history would not sit easily with the 'enterprise culture' of the Welsh Development Agency and the anodyne platitudes of the Wales Tourist Board. The outcome of the process was a much smaller version of the original vision (opening in 1989), and one that, operating at a deficit and underperforming in terms of visitor numbers, has had a minimal impact on the area's economic regeneration.

Dicks tells this story well, and goes on to deconstruct the narratives of the 'Black Gold experience' (the visitor tour) as well as to present the results of her ethnographic research into visitor responses. The result is a volume that should interest many within and without Wales, although it is not without defects. The grasp of historical detail is shaky and Dicks is inappropriately concerned to read contradictions between 'Welshness' and 'Britishness' into her understanding of Rhondda past and present. Occasionally, the sociological jargon obstructs, there is a mannered academicism about some of the writing, and the Harvard referencing style produces pages that resound to the opening and closing of brackets.

But, overall, this is an important contribution to debates about the heritage industry in Wales and beyond, and should be read by anyone interested in how Wales's past is (mis)interpreted.

Chris Williams

It is possible to use this review for promotional purposes, but the following acknowledgment should be included: A review from www.gwales.com, with the permission of the Welsh Books Council.

Gellir defnyddio'r adolygiad hwn at bwrpas hybu, ond gofynnir i chi gynnwys y gydnabyddiaeth ganlynol: Adolygiad oddi ar www.gwales.com, trwy ganiatâd Cyngor Llyfrau Cymru.
Gwybodaeth Bellach:
‘The debates in which this book engages have been repeatedly aired since the 1980s. Dicks presents a useful review of the literature. And the Rhondda provides an interesting case study . . . this book makes interesting reading and . . . is very competitively priced.’ (New Heritage)
‘ . . . a most interesting and fascinating text that illustrates precisely why case studies can be such a vivid means of exploring more generalised issues . . . This is no mere documentary, however, but a bold attempt to interweave competing constructs of heritage representation with the complexities of economic and political restructuring in the coalfields of South Wales . . . This book really should be compulsory reading for anyone interested in attraction development in the UK for, while being about a specific heritage attraction, the stages of the development, together with observations about the difficulties encountered, are redolent of the fraught process through which many such attractions go . . . an extremely interesting, well-written and provocative book. It is also something of a rarity, in presenting a detailed case study that makes strong connections with wider fields of interest. As such, it is highly recommended to all those interested in attraction planning, development and management.’ (International Journal of Heritage Studies)
‘ . . . I expect that it will become required reading for final year and postgraduate heritage management (and tourism) students, as well as the tourism research community. Thoughtful practitioners will also find much here to stimulate reflection . . . The text is scholarly, written carefully and well organised throughout. Its apparent simplicity of structure and coherence belies the careful planning and meticulous research that much have informed its development.’ (Tourism Management)
‘This stimulating book is much more than a story of one heritage site; it is a largely successful attempt to place that site in the context of its local and regional history as well as in the midst of the "heritage debate" and the attendant analysis of tourist practices . . . The result is a volume that should interest many within and without Wales . . . this is an important contribution to debates about the heritage industry in Wales and beyond, and should be read by anyone interested in how Wales's past is (mis)interpreted.’ (www.gwales.com)
The Rhondda Heritage Park is the only colliery building left in a valley which at one time supported sixty-six deep mines. As the only significant public memorial the Rhondda has to its mining industry, it demonstrates the potential of heritage to offer a thought-provoking and accessible representation of local identity and community. However, critics of heritage point out its pretensions, banalities and failures, and its tainted, entrepreneurial character.
In Heritage, Place and Community, Bella Dicks explores these contradictions in the concept and practice of heritage, shows how heritage has come to be adopted as an attempt to regenerate the cultural and economic identity of former industrial areas and discusses the role of heritage in the formation and negotiation of social identity.
This ground-breaking book is more than just a study of the development of the Rhondda Heritage Park. Using an innovative theoretical framework, Heritage, Place and Community brings together the economic, cultural, social and political dimensions of heritage production and consumption and seeks to trace the ways in which the study of heritage opens up wider questions of representation and politics.
Bella Dicks is a Lecturer in Sociology in the School of Social Sciences at Cardiff University. She is the author of several articles dealing with the relationships between heritage, community and identity.
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