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Gwybodaeth Lyfryddol
Religion, Culture and Society: Screen Christologies - Redemption and the Medium of Film
Christopher Deacy
ISBN: 9780708317129 (070831712X)Dyddiad Cyhoeddi Medi 2001
Cyhoeddwr: Gwasg Prifysgol Cymru / University of Wales Press, Caerdydd
Fformat: Clawr Meddal, 216x138 mm, 212 tudalen Iaith: Saesneg Allan o Stoc - Archebir yn l y galw Pris Llawn: £17.99 
Ein Pris: £14.99 
Rydych yn Arbed: £3.00 (16.7%) 
Does dim Adolygiad Cwsmer i'r teitl hwn.
 
Ysgrifennwch Adolygiad Cwsmer
Astudiaeth hynod ddiddorol o'r modd y cyflwynir y cysyniad Cristnogol o iachawdwriaeth gan y diwydiant sinema gyfoes a'r modd y gellir defnyddio cyfrwng y ffilm i drosglwyddo gobeithion a gwerthoedd crefyddol.

A fascinating study of the way in which the Christian concept of redemption is presented by the contemporary cinema industry and how the medium of film may be used to convey religious hopes and values.
When Travis Bickle stared into the mirror in Martin Scorsese’s 1976 movie Taxi Driver and asked, ‘you lookin’ at me?’, cinema history was created. However, in his book Screen Christologies: Redemption and the Medium of Film Christopher Deacy asks us to consider the possibility that more than simple movie magic was at work here. Deacy’s thesis concerning the nature of Christian redemption and its relationship to the cinematic product is a thoughtful and thought-provoking study of the ways in which secular film can appropriate and reinterpret the iconography of Christ’s suffering and introduce these themes to a wider audience.

Deacy takes his lead from the debate concerning the ways in which popular culture has taken over the role of providing ‘life-orientating images’ from orthodox religion. The ‘movie theatre as the new Church’ works on both a physical and a metaphorical level and provides the basis for Deacy’s investigation of film noir, with particular reference to the work of Martin Scorsese, as a site of redemption.

While it is possible to argue that the introduction may have benefited from a clearer distinction between a religious and a spiritual experience, Deacy’s text comes into its own in its discussion of Scorsese’s films. Through subtle readings of character and imagery, Deacy is able to make a compelling case for the ways in which protagonists in film noir can both experience and embody the type of redemptive activities that define Christ’s life as described in the Gospels. His argument is particularly interesting in relation to the central paradox of Christ’s life as both a spiritual and a human being, his humanity enabling him, through suffering, to act as a redeemer. Through this reading Deacy illuminates a number of fascinating connections between the ideal of Christ’s life and the downtrodden realities depicted in films like Cape Fear. His reading of the overtly religious character of Max Cady as a redemptive figure, through the suffering he causes to a fragmented modern family, is both fascinating and revealing.

While this book will undoubtedly appeal to anyone with an interest in the work of Martin Scorsese, it also makes a valuable contribution to the ongoing work of examining the ways in which religious thought continues to inform and shape our lives at a time when orthodox religions appear to be struggling to find an audience.

Petra Newman

It is possible to use this review for promotional purposes, but the following acknowledgment should be included: A review from www.gwales.com, with the permission of the Welsh Books Council.

Gellir defnyddio'r adolygiad hwn at bwrpas hybu, ond gofynnir i chi gynnwys y gydnabyddiaeth ganlynol: Adolygiad oddi ar www.gwales.com, trwy ganiatâd Cyngor Llyfrau Cymru.
Gwybodaeth Bellach:
Screen Christologies:
Redemption and the Medium of Film
Christopher Deacy
pp viii212 216 x 138 mm October 2001
paperback £14.99 0-7083-1712-X
hardback £30.00 0-7083-1713-8
Religious and spiritual
themes may be found in all kinds of unexpected places. For Christopher Deacy,
contemporary cinema, rather than being merely the expression of a secular or
commercial sensibility, is actually a significant medium for the articulation
of religious values in Western society.
‘ . . . Deacy’s is an intriguing and sustainable argument.’ (Church Times)
‘ . . . Deacy's text comes into its own in its discussion of Scorsese's films.
Through subtle readings of character and imagery, Deacy is able to make a
compelling case for the ways in which protagonists in film noir can
both experience and embody the type of redemptive activities that define
Christ's life as described in the Gospels. His argument is particularly
interesting in relation to the central paradox of Christ's life as both a
spiritual and a human being, his humanity enabling him, through suffering,
to act as a redeemer. Through this reading Deacy illuminates a number of
fascinating connections between the ideal of Christ's life and the
downtrodden realities depicted in films like Cape Fear. His reading
of the overtly religious character of Max Cady as a redemptive figure,
through the suffering he causes to a fragmented modern family, is both
fascinating and revealing.
While this book will undoubtedly appeal to anyone with an interest in the
work of Martin Scorsese, it also makes a valuable contribution to the
ongoing work of examining the ways in which religious thought continues to
inform and shape our lives at a time when orthodox religions appear to be
struggling to find an audience.’ www.gwales.com
‘Deacy’s book is . . . a welcome addition to this growing bibliography on theology and film . . . There is plenty of good quality theological discussion here and – as throughout the book – you may well find yourself wanting to hit the high street stores or video library to check it all out for yourself. Deacy succeeds in showing the vitality of film as a locus for theological and religious reflection. It is such a fruitful and accessible medium for these issues, and this book is an excellent addition to the resources that can help you and yours join this growing debate.’ Regent’s Reviews
Screen Christologies looks specifically at the ways in which the
Christian concept of redemption has been represented in film, from It’s a Wonderful Life to Taxi Driver. Concentrating on film noir and the work of Martin
Scorsese, Deacy argues that the themes of alienation and redemption through
violence, destruction and sin characteristic of the noir genre demonstrate that cinema confronts issues and themes that
are distinctly religious.
While the academic study
of religion has traditionally avoided dealing with the mass media as a serious
repository of religious activity, Screen
Christologies argues for a new and radical evaluation of contemporary
religiosity and for the importance of popular media in the study of religion.
It will be an essential book for all those interested in film and theology and
their place in the broader contexts of Christianity and contemporary culture.
Christopher Deacy is Leverhulme Research Fellow in the Department
of Theology and Religious Studies at the University of Wales, Lampeter. He is
the co-editor with Fiona Bowie of The
Coming Deliverer: Millennial Themes in World Religions (1997) and the
author of numerous articles dealing with cinema and religion.
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